Monthly Archives: March 2018

Slide, by Ken Bruen & Jason Starr

The Ken Bruen and Jason Starr collaboration Bust was at once bizarre and vulgar, but it was a fun read and turned out to be more enjoyable than I expected it to be. That was mostly due to its surprisingly … Continue reading

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Songs of Innocence, by Charles Ardai (as Richard Aleas)

After his strong debut crime novel Little Girl Lost, Charles Ardai – using his pseudonym Richard Aleas – continues the story of the private investigator John Blake with Songs of Innocence (2007). SoI also continues the usage of a William Blake-inspired title, … Continue reading

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Little Girl Lost, by Charles Ardai (as Richard Aleas)

The Hard Case Crime imprint is known for featuring novels by new or emerging crime authors, as is especially unusual in that it has printed the debut novel by its own co-founder, Charles Ardai. Ardai adopted the pseudonym Richard Aleas for this … Continue reading

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Orphans of the Sky, by Robert A. Heinlein

The “Future History” stories of Robert Heinlein, which dominated the initial phase of his long writing career, might now be his least-read works outside of his dedicated fans. When they were first published, however, these stories proved very influential. Orphans … Continue reading

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Soul Catcher, by Frank Herbert

As explained recently, I maintain an interest in Frank Herbert’s non-Dune books. Not only do we see many of his Dune ideas and inspirations in other forms, but we can also see that his ambitions as a writer extended well … Continue reading

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Blooded on Arachne, by Michael Bishop – part 2

This article continues of my overview of the first collection of Michael Bishop stories, Blood on Arachne (1982). In Part 1 I found the first four stories to be all worth reading, with “Blooded on Arachne” and “Cathadonian Odyssey” being … Continue reading

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The Dragon in the Sea, by Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert’s non-Dune novels tend to receive mixed reviews; many are criticized as pulp, or as incomprehensible think-pieces. I suppose any of these books are going suffer in comparison with Dune and the Dune series, but the ones I’ve read … Continue reading

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Blooded on Arachne, by Michael Bishop – part 1

I’ve been a fan of Michael Bishop’s work since discovering the reviews of the site SF Ruminations and reading Transfigurations. Much of his novel-length fiction focuses on the ideas and methods of anthropology, in a mixture of wonder and skepticism. … Continue reading

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Out of Their Minds, by Clifford D. Simak

Clifford Simak (1904-1988) was a journalist and science fiction writer whose stories steadily appeared from the 1940s through the 1970s. His life, and most of his fiction, took place in the towns, cities and (especially) countryside of the upper Midwestern … Continue reading

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Two for the Money, by Max Allan Collins

Max Allan Collins is so prolific that I had already read one his books long ago without realizing it (the novelization for the Dick Tracy movie, which I read on a school bus trip) until looking at his bibliography. Besides … Continue reading

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